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Bible Reflections View Comments

What Will We Pay for Peace of Mind?
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, September 22, 2013
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Today’s Gospel contains that oft-quoted line, “You cannot serve both God and mammon.” The key here is not the word mammon (money), but the word serve. If we let our concern for material goods overmaster us, we will be in trouble.

We spend a great deal of our time working for money—and the things it can buy. But too often we place ourselves and others at the service of our economy rather than letting our good fortune make the world a better place.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus tells the story of a man who, knowing that he’s going to lose his job, goes to all the people who owe his master money and offers to lower the amount they owe.

It’s easy to get distracted by the fact that Jesus seems to be praising the steward for what we might see as dishonest business practices. We feel especially virtuous when we take this detour. We pat ourselves on the back for not behaving this badly. Some commentators have suggested, however, that the amount the steward was taking off the bill was the amount that would have been his commission.

The steward has come to a point in his life when he needs to rely on the generosity, even the charity, of others. If he mistreated his business associates harshly in the past, he has little chance of getting another job. If he’s only concerned about his profits and doing well for himself, he will find himself alone and destitute. So he sacrifices his profits, using his money to buy at least some sort of good feeling from others.

The message throughout the Scriptures is that if we’re right with God, our only true master, we will be right with other people as well. If we put something else in place of God, that misplaced desire will throw our other relationships out of whack. Money is the most obvious example of greed, but not the only one.

The prophet Amos reviles the people who resent the sabbath for the way it interferes with their business, which seems to involve not only commerce but a particularly vicious cheating that shows a complete disregard for others. His words still hold a bite for us today.

We pride ourselves on abolishing slavery, and yet when Amos says, “We will buy the lowly for silver and the poor for a pair of sandals,” we might recall images of children in developing countries being paid pennies for working 15 or 17 hours a day to make high-priced sneakers. Factory conditions in India and Bangladesh have led to horrendous fires and building collapses, but we continue to buy cheap clothing from companies that disavow any responsibility for those conditions.

We criticize illegal immigrants who search for a better life in America, and yet we turn a blind eye to the employers who know they can hire (and exploit) these workers more cheaply than they can hire American citizens.

Today’s message is stark and unavoidable. Money can never be more important than God—or God’s creation either. No status, no bank account, no influence is more important than another human being. We might think we can close our eyes to the injustices perpetrated in the name of profit, but we will pay a high price in the end. We think we’ve bought peace of mind, but our God says otherwise. Only justice will bring peace.


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Gregory the Great: Coming events cast their shadows before: Gregory was the prefect of Rome before he was 30. After five years in office he resigned, founded six monasteries on his Sicilian estate and became a Benedictine monk in his own home at Rome. 
<p>Ordained a priest, he became one of the pope's seven deacons, and also served six years in the East as papal representative in Constantinople. He was recalled to become abbot, and at the age of 50 was elected pope by the clergy and people of Rome. </p><p>He was direct and firm. He removed unworthy priests from office, forbade taking money for many services, emptied the papal treasury to ransom prisoners of the Lombards and to care for persecuted Jews and the victims of plague and famine. He was very concerned about the conversion of England, sending 40 monks from his own monastery. He is known for his reform of the liturgy, for strengthening respect for doctrine. Whether he was largely responsible for the revision of "Gregorian" chant is disputed. </p><p>Gregory lived in a time of perpetual strife with invading Lombards and difficult relations with the East. When Rome itself was under attack, he interviewed the Lombard king. </p><p>An Anglican historian has written: "It is impossible to conceive what would have been the confusion, the lawlessness, the chaotic state of the Middle Ages without the medieval papacy; and of the medieval papacy, the real father is Gregory the Great." </p><p>His book, <i>Pastoral Care</i>, on the duties and qualities of a bishop, was read for centuries after his death. He described bishops mainly as physicians whose main duties were preaching and the enforcement of discipline. In his own down-to-earth preaching, Gregory was skilled at applying the daily gospel to the needs of his listeners. Called "the Great," Gregory has been given a place with Augustine (August 28), Ambrose (December 7) and Jerome (September 30)as one of the four key doctors of the Western Church.</p> American Catholic Blog The pierced, open side of Christ on the cross, which makes visible the Sacred Heart of the Son of God, remains “the way in” to knowledge of Jesus Christ.

 
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