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Bible Reflections View Comments

Love and Faith in Tough Times
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, August 18, 2013
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Perhaps you’ve heard someone say, “Friends are the family you choose.” We might say that about people who share our religious beliefs. We have an image of faith being passed down in families, almost part of our genetic identity. This is especially true in cultures that are traditionally Catholic. Today’s Gospel reminds us that even at the time of Jesus, this wasn’t always the case.

“From now on a household of five will be divided, three against two and two against three.” These words from Luke’s Gospel can startle us. We’re so familiar with Jesus preaching a message of peace and love that these words about division and conflict seem harsh, even frightening.

Jesus’s words offer a kind of tough love, a comfort to those who are struggling with family issues and questions of religious expression. They name a reality that many people experience but feel guilty about. To hear Jesus himself say that following him may break even the most sacred bond of family ties can offer hope in the midst of darkness.

Religious identity, and the deeper questions of faith that accompany it, can be a stormy time for many people. Certainly for the early Christian community, people were confronted with the realization that they were no longer welcome in synagogues because of their commitment to the way of Christ. The reality of the communities that produced the Gospels was that people were being rejected by their families of blood and searching for new family ties with those who shared their belief in Jesus as the Messiah.

Many people who come into our Catholic faith from other denominations, other religions, or no religion find themselves wrestling with objections from family members, even rejection. Hearing Jesus’s words today at least gives these people a sense of not being alone in their struggle, as well as some assurance that faith in Christ is worth the price.

Even lifelong Catholics find themselves going through transitions in their faith and their Catholic identity. Sometimes it’s more difficult for these “cradle Catholics,” because there’s no ritual for claiming an adult commitment to one’s religion.

Polls and studies over the years have shown that many people drift away from the Church in their young adult years. They may have been raised Catholic, gone to Catholic schools, but the pressures of being away from home, the fascination with learning new things and encountering new cultures, can distract them from things they took for granted. Often they return to church when they marry or have children, or when they go through some life crisis.

Sometimes young Catholics find themselves searching for a more intense expression of religion than their parents have. Religion can be a way to carve out a distinct identity, a way of being in the world that’s not the same as we had growing up. This can lead to conflict and confusion.

The key, perhaps, is to focus not on the division, not on the conflict, but on the ultimate goal: a deeper commitment to Christ, a closer relationship with his followers, whoever and wherever they are. We will find the love and faith we need if we focus on Christ.


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Martyrdom of John the Baptist: The drunken oath of a king with a shallow sense of honor, a seductive dance and the hateful heart of a queen combined to bring about the martyrdom of John the Baptist. The greatest of prophets suffered the fate of so many Old Testament prophets before him: rejection and martyrdom. The “voice crying in the desert” did not hesitate to accuse the guilty, did not hesitate to speak the truth. But why? What possesses a man that he would give up his very life? 
<p>This great religious reformer was sent by God to prepare the people for the Messiah. His vocation was one of selfless giving. The only power that he claimed was the Spirit of Yahweh. “I am baptizing you with water, for repentance, but the one who is coming after me is mightier than I. I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire” (Matthew 3:11). Scripture tells us that many people followed John looking to him for hope, perhaps in anticipation of some great messianic power. John never allowed himself the false honor of receiving these people for his own glory. He knew his calling was one of preparation. When the time came, he led his disciples to Jesus: “The next day John was there again with two of his disciples, and as he watched Jesus walk by, he said, ‘Behold, the Lamb of God.’ The two disciples heard what he said and followed Jesus” (John 1:35-37). It is John the Baptist who has pointed the way to Christ. John’s life and death were a giving over of self for God and other people. His simple style of life was one of complete detachment from earthly possessions. His heart was centered on God and the call that he heard from the Spirit of God speaking to his heart. Confident of God’s grace, he had the courage to speak words of condemnation or repentance, of salvation.</p> American Catholic Blog Those who pray learn to favor and prefer God’s judgment over that of human beings. God always outdoes us in generosity and in receptivity. God is always more loving than the person who has loved you the most!

 
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