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Bible Reflections View Comments

Are We Too Busy to Hear the Lord?
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, July 21, 2013
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In today’s Gospel we hear the familiar story of Mary and Martha, the two sisters who, along with their brother, Lazarus, welcome Jesus into their home in Bethany. This family must have been particularly close to Jesus. We also see them in John’s Gospel, when Lazarus dies and Martha and Mary confront Jesus over his late arrival. In both stories, the sisters are both clearly familiar enough with Jesus to be able to speak to him directly.

This story offers scholars a look at cultural conventions of the time—and ways in which Jesus was willing to bend those conventions in service of the Gospel. They talk about how Mary, in assuming the listening role of a disciple, probably scandalized onlookers because such a role was reserved for men. They say Jesus is affirming that Mary had the right to assume that role.

But there’s more to the story than a lesson in first-century Palestinian culture, or a debate over gender-specific roles. The story of Mary and Martha can be set in our own kitchens and living rooms—or factory floors and corporate offices. My sister and I have a running joke that she’s Martha and I’m Mary. When either one of us uses the name, it speaks volumes. She might be telling me to get something done. I might be telling her to take time to relax.

Many of us have had Martha’s experience of feeling as though someone else was getting away with not carrying their fair share of the load. It might be a sibling not helping with dishes—or the care of elderly parents. It might be a coworker who takes everyone else’s ideas and presents them as original thoughts to much praise—and compensation. It might be someone who consistently shirks difficult tasks with one excuse or another.

It’s easy to sympathize with Martha and to be shocked at Jesus’s admonition that Mary had chosen the better part. Our busyness becomes its own rationalization. When we’re busy, we feel like our lives have more value. When we’re busy, we don’t have to be available to help others. When we’re busy, we don’t have to listen to God asking us to do something different. Jesus tells Martha, “You are worried and anxious about many things.” Most likely he would tell us the same thing. When we find ourselves feeling stressed by demands and expectations, we might ask how many of those things are truly essential in the larger picture. If we can do this, we will discover for ourselves what it means to choose the better part.

Today’s first reading from Genesis shows us that Abraham was every bit as busy as Martha in providing hospitality for his visitors, but he did it with ease and a lack of anxiety. Perhaps we can learn from him to do what we’re doing without worrying about other people’s expectations or contributions. Like Mary sitting at the feet of Jesus, he was focused on the one thing necessary at the time. And in doing so, he was creating a restful oasis for his visitors. And the Lord blessed his efforts.

Our world needs both Martha’s activity and Mary’s prayerful attention to the word of God. The former doesn’t need to be restless and anxious; the latter doesn’t need to be passive. We will be at our best when we can suit our personalities to the needs of the moment, always being attentive to the Lord’s deepest desire for our lives.


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Peter Chrysologus: A man who vigorously pursues a goal may produce results far beyond his expectations and his intentions. Thus it was with Peter of the Golden Words, as he was called, who as a young man became bishop of Ravenna, the capital of the empire in the West. 
<p>At the time there were abuses and vestiges of paganism evident in his diocese, and these he was determined to battle and overcome. His principal weapon was the short sermon, and many of them have come down to us. They do not contain great originality of thought. They are, however, full of moral applications, sound in doctrine and historically significant in that they reveal Christian life in fifth-century Ravenna. So authentic were the contents of his sermons that, some 13 centuries later, he was declared a doctor of the Church by Pope Benedict XIII. He who had earnestly sought to teach and motivate his own flock was recognized as a teacher of the universal Church. </p><p>In addition to his zeal in the exercise of his office, Peter Chrysologus was distinguished by a fierce loyalty to the Church, not only in its teaching, but in its authority as well. He looked upon learning not as a mere opportunity but as an obligation for all, both as a development of God-given faculties and as a solid support for the worship of God. </p><p>Some time before his death, St. Peter returned to Imola, his birthplace, where he died around A.D. 450.</p> American Catholic Blog Prayer should be more listening than speaking. God gave you two ears and one mouth...use them proportionately.

 
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