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Bible Reflections View Comments

Don't Be Afraid of the Big Questions
By Diane M. Houdek
Source: Bringing Home the Word
Published: Sunday, March 9, 2014
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The German poet Rainer Maria Rilke wrote in his Letters to a Young Poet, “Live the questions now. Perhaps then, someday far in the future, you will gradually, without even noticing it, live your way into the answer.”

Rilke wasn’t talking about the questions we google every day. inquiries about facts and DIY projects and prescription drug side effects. Nor was he talking about the somewhat artificial Q&A of an interview, an advice column or a catechism. He was talking about the deep questions about who we are and what we’re here on earth to accomplish.

Jesus, though divine, was born into a fallen human world and had lived a life of questioning and being questioned from the moment of his conception. His mother asked the angel, “How can this be?” As Jesus grew, he questioned the elders in the temple, he questioned his parents and they questioned him. John the Baptist questioned Jesus when he came to him for baptism.
,br> It was probably no surprise that after forty days in the desert, he would be questioned once more. In our Gospel passage today, he’s being asked the difficult questions by Satan, the devil, the tempter. But surely Satan’s questions were no more challenging than the questions he had been asking himself about his ministry, his mission, his message. The questions of the desert would prepare him for a public life of questioning in the marketplace, in the temple and finally on the cross.

Jesus is able to respond to the questions of the Tempter because he knows the genuine love of God supported by a faith made strong in suffering, in need and in questioning.

Like Jesus, we must live both the struggle of the questions and the faith of the answers. Our temptations aren’t likely to come to us from a mysterious figure in a deserted place. But often they revolve around the same basic human drives: hunger, emotional security, safety, status, ambition.

Some lie awake too many nights wondering if they’ve made the right choices for their lives, their careers. Others question whether a successful position with a company engaged in questionable ethical practices is a compromise they’re willing to make. Many people fight against the demon of selfdoubt and insecurity, afraid they don’t deserve more than the bad hand they’ve been dealt in life.

Sometimes the questions themselves are coming from God, asking us to make life-giving changes in our lives. It’s the easy answers that are the temptation, the decisions that seem to bring happiness and success but are really driving us further away from our center.

The responses Jesus gives to his tempter are deeply rooted in the words of Scripture. He’s not rattling off memorized verses. He’s speaking out of a lived awareness of the power of the word of God. Lent is the perfect time to deepen our own immersion in Scripture. The story of God’s undying care for the people he has chosen as his own can mirror the stories of our own lives. Let the words wash over you. Let them speak to the situations and emotions of your daily life.

The Word has its own power to move us and inspire us and to remind us of God’s presence. It is this power that is, in the end, the answer.


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Peter Julian Eymard: Born in La Mure d'Isère in southeastern France, Peter Julian's faith journey drew him from being a priest in the Diocese of Grenoble (1834) to joining the Marists (1839) to founding the Congregation of the Blessed Sacrament (1856). 
<p>In addition to those changes, Peter Julian coped with poverty, his father's initial opposition to Peter's vocation, serious illness, a Jansenistic overemphasis on sin and the difficulties of getting diocesan and later papal approval for his new religious community. </p><p>His years as a Marist, including service as a provincial leader, saw the deepening of his eucharistic devotion, especially through his preaching of Forty Hours in many parishes.<p.the x="" in="" 1905.<p="" piux="" pope="" by="" backing="" authoritative="" more="" given="" idea="" an="" communion,="" holy="" frequent="" of="" proponent="" tireless="" a="" was="" he="" again.="" communion="" receiving="" begin="" and="" repent="" to="" them="" inviting="" catholics,="" non-practicing="" out="" reached="" also="" it="" communion.="" first="" their="" receive="" prepare="" paris="" children="" with="" working="" began="" sacrament="" blessed="" the="" congregation="">Inspired at first by the idea of reparation for indifference to the Eucharist, Peter Julian was eventually attracted to a more positive spirituality of Christ-centered love. Members of the men's community, which Peter founded, alternated between an active apostolic life and contemplating Jesus in the Eucharist. He and Marguerite Guillot founded the women's Congregation of the Servants of the Blessed Sacrament. 
<p>Peter Julian Eymard was beatified in 1925 and canonized in 1962, one day after Vatican II's first session ended.</p></p.the></p><p></p><p></p><p></p> American Catholic Blog Let us learn to be detached from possessiveness and from the idolatry of money and lavish spending. Let us put Jesus first. –Pope Francis

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