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ON FAITH & MEDIA View Comments

Monsters University

By
Joseph McAleer
Source: Catholic News Service


Animated characters appear in the movie "Monsters University."
Your friendly neighborhood monsters are back. This time, they're heading to college and screaming up a storm in "Monsters University" (Disney), a 3-D animated prequel to the 2001 hit "Monsters, Inc."

This hilarious sendup of academia provides the backstory to key characters. It also reinforces familiar but important messages for young people (and their parents): Make friends, work together, study hard, and apply your unique talents for the greater good.

A prequel is never easy, as the audience already knows what has become of the main characters, best friends Mike Wazowski (voice of Billy Crystal), a lime-green eyeball, and James P. "Sully" Sullivan (voice of John Goodman), a purple bearlike creature.

Director Dan Scanlon meets the challenge with dozens of new characters (cue the merchandising) and a slapstick-filled script (by Scanlon, Robert Baird and Daniel Gerson) that offers a sanitized cross between "National Lampoon's Animal House" and "Revenge of the Nerds."

For the uninitiated, the city of Monstropolis is powered by the energy gleaned from screaming human children, frightened by the monsters that appear in their bedrooms at night. Scream-inducing talent must be developed, hence the elite School of Scaring at Monsters U.

Founded in 1313, the university is committed to "the relentless pursuit of monster potential," according to its mission statement. "Scaring is the true measure of the monster," intones Dean Hardscrabble (voice of Helen Mirren), a formidable flying centipede.

Mike, bullied as a child because of his small stature, is determined to succeed. He cracks the books and rises to the top of Scaring 101 class. He's the opposite of Sully, a fun-loving popular guy who gained admission as a legacy; his father was a famous "scarer."

The two lock horns in class and are thrown out of the program. Eager for a second chance, Mike discovers the Scare Games, a rumble organized by the college's fraternities to see who's the meanest and most menacing.

To enter, Mike must join a fraternity, but none will have him, not the athletes of Jaws Theta Chi (JOX) or the meanies of Gamma Roar Roar (GRR). Only Ozzma Kappa (OK) will take him in.

As fraternities go, OK is the Island of Misfit Toys, whose relentlessly cheerful members embrace their motto ("I'm OK!") and would rather sit around drinking cocoa than be scary. But victory in the games would mean readmission to the School of Scaring. So with Sully on board, Mike inspires his frat mates to reach for the top.

Preceding "Monsters University" is a charming short film from Pixar, "The Blue Umbrella," which explores love among parasols on a rainy city street. Both films are clean and wholesome fun for the entire family.

The Catholic News Service classification is A-I -- general patronage. The Motion Picture Association of America rating is G -- general audiences. All ages admitted.

*****
Joseph McAleer is a guest reviewer for Catholic News Service.



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Thomas Aquinas: By universal consent, Thomas Aquinas is the preeminent spokesman of the Catholic tradition of reason and of divine revelation. He is one of the great teachers of the medieval Catholic Church, honored with the titles Doctor of the Church and Angelic Doctor. 
<p>At five he was given to the Benedictine monastery at Monte Cassino in his parents’ hopes that he would choose that way of life and eventually became abbot. In 1239 he was sent to Naples to complete his studies. It was here that he was first attracted to Aristotle’s philosophy. </p><p>By 1243, Thomas abandoned his family’s plans for him and joined the Dominicans, much to his mother’s dismay. On her order, Thomas was captured by his brother and kept at home for over a year. </p><p>Once free, he went to Paris and then to Cologne, where he finished his studies with Albert the Great. He held two professorships at Paris, lived at the court of Pope Urban IV, directed the Dominican schools at Rome and Viterbo, combated adversaries of the mendicants, as well as the Averroists, and argued with some Franciscans about Aristotelianism. </p><p>His greatest contribution to the Catholic Church is his writings. The unity, harmony and continuity of faith and reason, of revealed and natural human knowledge, pervades his writings. One might expect Thomas, as a man of the gospel, to be an ardent defender of revealed truth. But he was broad enough, deep enough, to see the whole natural order as coming from God the Creator, and to see reason as a divine gift to be highly cherished. </p><p>The <i>Summa Theologiae</i>, his last and, unfortunately, uncompleted work, deals with the whole of Catholic theology. He stopped work on it after celebrating Mass on December 6, 1273. When asked why he stopped writing, he replied, “I cannot go on.... All that I have written seems to me like so much straw compared to what I have seen and what has been revealed to me.” He died March 7, 1274.</p> American Catholic Blog We talk often about how we are God’s “hands and feet,” which is true. That being said, we can’t fall into the trap of thinking God needs us like we need Him. He’s God—which makes the reality that He wants to use us and be in a relationship with us an even sweeter, more profound truth.

 
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